ThetaHealing

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Vianna Stibal

ThetaHealing is a pseudo-medical method of treatment and a registered trademark developed by US-citizen Vianna Stibal. It is a variant of DNA activation protected by trademarks under a variety of names.

The method's name refers to the Theta range of electroencephalography. A frequency range between 4 and 8 cycles per second is called Theta range and is divided into a slow (4-6 cycles per second) and a fast range (7-8 cycles per second). The amplitudes fall within a range of approx. 100 µV. This frequency range also occurs with open eyes and increases during phases of light. Newborn children show a clear Theta range as well. The frequency spectrum of the EEG may basically be affected by different influences or behaviour (solving arithmetic problems, light stimulus, acoustic stimulus, sleep or relaxation).

Inventor Vianna Stibal

no cancer diagnosis[1]
Real/Photoshop[2]

US-citizen Vianna Stibal, living in Idaho, alleges to have been diagnosed with bone cancer in one femur as well as with a malignant lymphoma in August 1995.[3] She claims to have had a life expectancy of a few months. Due to the tumour, her leg allegedly shrank by 7 to 20 cms; the actual figure varies in different videos and texts in which Stibal describes the effects.[4] However, she claims, creator spoke to her and by praying she sent healing powers into her leg which removed the tumour. Her leg allegedly regained its original length immediately.

As a matter of fact, Stibal was never diagnosed with cancer in the very first place, as is revealed by a screenshot of medical certificates presented by her in a video show.

In various videos, books, and other publications she presents a multitude of statements regarding the achievements of the Theta method. AIDS, cancer, fractures, parasite infestation, diabetes etc. can be healed according to Stibal, or have already been healed.[2] She also claims to have healed her car.[5]

In her book "Go up and Seek God" she claims the title of a "doctor of naturopathy". While this title is of doubtful nature in itself, and is not officially acknowledged in German speaking countries[6], Stibal never attended any institution assigning such a title, much less obtained a doctorate there.

Personal photos published on her website have been subject to an intense Photoshop finishing, as is revealed by a comparison of live shots to one of the pictures on her site.

Alleged functional principle

By a short ritual similar to meditation and concentrating on thoughts and prayer, the electrical activity (expressed as EEG) of Theta and Gamma ranges is to be raised. In this condition, the intuition based on absolute love of god ("Creator Of All That Is") is said to be applied. “Mental disturbances” are to be eliminated by internal mental orders. As a consequence, the subconscious will obey this “order” immediately. This is allegedly effected by strongly formative characteristics of Theta and Gamma waves of the brain. Pains allegedly disappear spontaneously and behaviour patterns will be corrected.

The method allegedly is appropriate to cause changes on all four levels: physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual. Faith and feeling in turn are said to effect another four levels: quintessence, genes, history, and soul. Stibal specifies so-called poisonous emotions (“toxic emotion”) which were allegedly proven scientifically and, according to Stibal, were causing diseases.[7].

In this meditative condition, DNA activations are also to be accomplished which are said to bring about any result.

Training courses

On her website, various courses for DNA activation can be booked. The courses take two to five days and cost between 500$ and 2,000$. Courses for instructors range from 1,000$ to 4,500$. Cheaper initial courses are mandatory. However, instructors will only be trained by Vianna Stibal in person.[8]

BBC report on ThetaHealing

According to a BBC report, there are about 600 ThetaHealing operators in the United Kingdom. They demand between £30 for a telephone call and £400 for a course. A healer visited undercover claimed to have healed a child of cancer via telephone. In an interview, a former client expressed regret he spent £1,200 on a futile treatment, thus losing two years during which he could have been treated medically. When the BBC attempted to obtain a statement from Vianna Stibal, she refused to comment, while her husband attacked the camera operator.

In this report, Professor Edzard Ernst of the University of Exeter and a representative of an HIV foundation criticized ThetaHealing as nonsense, criminal, dangerous, and quackery.[9]

Bibliography

The books published by Vianna Stibal are characterised by poor grammar, are extremely defective, and are each nothing but a reorganization rehashing her basic material.[10]

  • Go Up and Work With God, Zweite Edition, Jänner 2002, Rolling Thunder ISBN 9780967175416
  • ThetaHealing: Disease and Disorder, Jänner 2009, ASIN B001P8BBQ
  • Advanced Thetahealing All That Is, Juli 2009, Rolling Thunder ISBN 978-0967175492
  • ThetaHealing: Introducing an Extraordinary Energy Healing Modality, December 2010, Hay House Inc. ISBN 978-1-4019-2928-2

Unfair advertising practices

On their UK-hosted webpage, publisher Hay House advertised their recent book with the claim of a cure for cancer. Subsequently, sceptics pressed charges against Hay House who had to withdraw the advertisement.[11]

Versions of this article in other languages

References

  1. Theta Healing Unmasked, retrieved Dec. 26, 2010
  2. 2.0 2.1 Theta Healing Unmasked statements
  3. ThetaHealing Website, short biography, retrieved Dec. 26, 2010
  4. Theta Healing Unmasked
  5. ThetaHealing Website, Short biography retrieved June 26, 2011
  6. Wikipedia article on "Naturopathic", retrieved Dec. 26, 2010
  7. About ThetaHealing® retrieved June 26, 2011
  8. ThetaHealing Website, Kursübersicht, retrieved Dec. 26, 2010
  9. The faith healers who claim they can cure cancer, BBC Newsnight, Wednesday, June 22, 2011
  10. Theta Healing Unmasked PDF, retrieved Dec. 26, 2010
  11. Sceptical Letter Writer Blog, retrieved Dec. 26, 2010